Jedi First Responder – First Aid for the Jedi bystander

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24 Sep 2013 06:39 #119379 by Phortis Nespin
This was cool. Short videos on the anatomy of the body. This is just an FYI link.

Anatomy Videos

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26 Sep 2013 22:30 #119686 by Phortis Nespin

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02 Aug 2014 02:23 - 02 Aug 2014 02:24 #154318 by Phortis Nespin
Last edit: 02 Aug 2014 02:24 by Phortis Nespin.

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04 Aug 2014 05:06 - 19 Oct 2014 22:57 #154523 by Adder
INFECTION CONTROL MEASURES

Personal protection
  • Treat any body fluid as though it is infectious
  • Hand hygiene is the single most important infection control measure
  • Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds after assisting ill travelers or coming in contact with body fluids or surfaces that may be contaminated.
  • An alcohol-based hand cleaner is an alternative to hand-washing but will not be effective if hands are visibly soiled.
  • Avoid touching your mouth, eyes, and nose with unwashed or gloved hands.
Disposable gloves
Gloves do not replace proper hand hygiene! Wear impermeable, disposable gloves when:
  • physically tending to an ill person
  • coming in contact with body fluids (such as used tissues, blood, vomit, or diarrhea), potentially contaminated surfaces or lavatories

Remove gloves carefully to avoid contaminating yourself or your clothing.
Properly dispose of soiled gloves after use into a plastic bag, and do not re-use.
Wash your hands with soap and water or with an alcohol-based hand cleaner after removing gloves.

Face masks
Surgical-type face masks worn by an ill person may help reduce the spread of respiratory germs from coughing, sneezing or talking.

Management of ill person
Respiratory infections
Minimize the number of persons directly exposed to the ill person.
Keep interactions with the ill person as brief as possible.
Ask the ill person to cover his or her mouth with a tissue when coughing or sneezing.
Provide tissues, if necessary and provide a plastic bag for disposing of used tissues.
Ask the ill person to wear a face mask particularly for persistent cough, if it can be tolerated and one is available.
Encourage the ill person to wash hands and/or use alcohol-based hand cleaner (if available).
Separate the ill person from others, if possible, and without compromising safety or exposing additional people.

Gastrointestinal infections
Minimize the number of persons directly exposed to the ill person.
Keep interactions with the ill person as brief as possible.
Seat the ill person close to a lavatory, if possible.
If possible, restrict the use of that lavatory to only the ill person.
If the person is vomiting, provide sickness bags.
Provide a plastic bag for disposing of used air-sickness bags.
Encourage the ill person to wash hands and/or use alcohol-based hand cleaner (if available).

Blood-borne infections
If the ill person is actively bleeding, such as from an injury or nosebleed, provide first aid accordingly.
Separate the ill person from others far enough to reduce the likelihood of blood splattering on other people, if possible.
Provide a plastic bag for disposing soiled tissues or towels.

Targeted Clean-Up
Hard (nonporous) surfaces, such as tray tables, TV monitors, windows and walls that are visibly soiled: remove visible contaminations, then clean with a cleaning or disinfectant agent.
Soft (porous) surfaces, such as carpeted floor or seat cushions that are obviously soiled, such as with vomit or diarrhea: first remove as much of the contaminant as possible, then cover the area with an absorbent substance, followed by an impermeable material, such as plastic, to reduce the risk of spread beyond the immediate area or into the air.
If a contaminated item can be easily removed, is small enough to fit inside a plastic bag* (such as a pillow, blanket or small cushion), carefully place it inside a plastic bag* and tie or tape the bag shut securely to avoid leaking.
Dispose of used cleaning materials in a plastic bag*, immediately after use.

*Biohazard bag if available; otherwise secure in plastic bag and label as biohazard

Post-Patient Measures
Properly dispose of contaminated items
Place all receptacles that have been used by the ill person, as well as all bags containing materials used to clean up, in a plastic bag and tie it securely (see * above).
Notify authorities of areas that have been contaminated (specify respiratory, gastrointestinal, and/or blood-borne body fluids) which may need more than routine cleaning or possible removal.
Remind authorities that this may require additional personal protective equipment.

When to see a health care provider after exposure to ill persons
Any person who thinks he or she has been exposed should take the following precautions:
  • Notify your employer immediately.
  • Monitor your health for symptoms.
  • Before visiting a health care provider, alert the clinic or emergency room in advance about your possible exposure so that arrangements can be made to prevent spreading it to others.
  • When traveling to a health care provider, limit contact with other people. Avoid all other travel.

Knight ~ introverted extropian, mechatronic neurothealogizing, technogaian buddhist. Likes integration, visualization, elucidation and transformation.
Jou ~ Deg ~ Vlo ~ Sem ~ Mod ~ Med ~ Dis
TM: Grand Master Mark Anjuu
Last edit: 19 Oct 2014 22:57 by Adder.
The following user(s) said Thank You: J_Roz, Phortis Nespin, Wescli Wardest

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19 Oct 2014 11:59 #164966 by J_Roz
I don't know how I missed this topic until now. This is a fantastic thread! Thank you so much Phortis! Great information!

"O Great Spirit, Help me always to speak the truth quietly, to listen with an open mind when others speak, and to remember the peace that may be found in silence"

Kaylee: How come you don't care where you're going?
Book: 'Cause how you get there is the worthier part.
Firefly Series

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08 Nov 2014 03:32 - 08 Nov 2014 03:47 #168700 by Phortis Nespin
The "Pink Book" by the CDC is by far the scariest book I have read. (not all of it but the parts I have read) The information contained within will leave you never touching another person, animal, or inanimate object. :S

It by far is the best information you can find to understand and cut through the BS. A little scientific at times for us common, down home, people of the land...you know...morons! :lol: (Blazing Saddles ref.)

www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/pinkbook/index.html

For more publications by the CDC:
www.cdc.gov/publications/

There is a good publication under Immunization and Vaccines for expectant mothers and those with children getting immunized.
www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/preg-guide.htm
www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/parents-guide/default.htm

If you plan to travel, check this part of the CDC website for health information:
wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/destinations/list

One last thing, this app for avoiding food issues may come in handy:
wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/apps-about
Last edit: 08 Nov 2014 03:47 by Phortis Nespin.

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08 Nov 2014 03:58 #168702 by Phortis Nespin
Here is a website that will help you prepare for disaster situations. It shows you how to build a prep kit, get involved, make plans, and what to do with children. Natural disasters are taking their toll on everyone and the government may not be able to get to you and your family for days, or maybe weeks. Be prepared by making your own 72 hour prep kit.

If I were you, I would think in weeks not days.

www.ready.gov

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08 Nov 2014 11:04 - 08 Nov 2014 11:19 #168733 by Cyan Sarden
As a teacher, I've received some training in CPR. I can't stress enough how important it is for everyone to do get some basic knowledge. It's not only that often you can save a person's life with relatively simple methods. It also gives you peace of mind if you don't succeed. Unfortunately, I was in a situation where I needed my CPR / emergency response skills about a year ago when during a further education course a person collapsed. I didn't do CPR myself as a colleague got to him first, but I did what I was trained to, looked for a defibrillator (there was none) and ultimately guided the paramedics to the person in distress. The man didn't make it - the paramedics shocked him for almost two hours (his heart was still in fibrillation at that time, but the doctor had to give up eventually). My colleague and I know that we did everything right. I couldn't have lived with myself if I hadn't had any idea what to do. The outcome would have been the same but it would have been a lot worse for everyone around.

Do not look for happiness outside yourself. The awakened seek happiness inside.
Last edit: 08 Nov 2014 11:19 by Cyan Sarden.
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05 Feb 2015 22:37 #180415 by Phortis Nespin
Attachments:

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18 Apr 2015 20:39 #188804 by Locksley
I think that this is a really great topic. Having a clear and solid understanding of proper emergency responses is one of the most important and solid skills anyone can have. As someone living in California, I know that in the event of a serious earthquake EMS may not be available immediately - or at all, for an unforeseeable amount of time. I've had basic first responder training through lifeguard training, as well as an introduction to firefighting class - but I can safely say that it wouldn't be enough in an emergency. If you want to really do some good, you definitely need to go through the official training courses - and heck, take more than one. Keep your ID up to date, and when practice seminars come into your area, attend!

Also, as other people here have already mention, the "Good Samaritan" laws vary greatly from location to location. Here in CA for instance the law is basically worthless, as evidenced here . Definitely make sure to do your reading. When in doubt, get the certified training, and it will be likely to protect you in most circumstances.

If you live in the US, check out the American Red Cross website for information about local training opportunities. Usually the price is relatively affordable, and the benefits are a very useful skill set. That said, remember that one course will not prepare you for everything - nor is it enough to only take the class once every renewal period. Keep your muscle memory sharp by taking refresher courses whenever possible.

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