Shaolin Kung Fu/Wushu

  • HesinRaca
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15 Apr 2007 20:34 #826 by HesinRaca
Shaolin Kung Fu/Wushu was created by HesinRaca
Here begins a thread for the discussion of Shaolin Wushu as practiced by the Shaolin monks of old as well as Shaolin Kung Fu, which is more or less a more practical and less ancient form of the same school.

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  • Twsoundsoff
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21 Apr 2007 01:12 #1117 by Twsoundsoff
Replied by Twsoundsoff on topic Shaolin Kung Fu/Wushu
Could you elaborate for us on what exactly Shoalin Kung Fu/Wushu is and how it differs from other martial arts?

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  • HesinRaca
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21 Apr 2007 06:22 #1123 by HesinRaca
Replied by HesinRaca on topic Shaolin Kung Fu/Wushu
Shaolin Kung Fu is the martial art form in CHina dating back around 1660 and associated with the Shaolin budhist temples. Shaolin means \"external\" school, as opposed to \"Wudang\" which means \"internal\" school, and generally described the nature of the school of thought, whether it be the '\"soft internal\" arts such as Tai Ji(Tai Chi), and the hard external styles such as Kung Fu or Hung Gar. \"Kung fu\" means roughly any skill that is prefected individually; meaning that while Kung Fu could be the perfection of smithing, to leatherwork, to harvesting, in this case it means the perfecting of the Shaolin philosophy, primarily in a martial sense. The Term \"Wushu\" means \"Martial art\" and is thus a more specific concept than kung fu as \"specific skill\". In either case it is the same thing, except that modern Wushu is entirely for show and has lost many of its connections to applicable martial arts. As such, it is best to describe Shaolin Kung Fu as a kung fu, because this not only connects it with the historical form, but also with the philosophical natures of the Shaolin.

Shaolin Kung fu exemplifies the concept of \"Qi\" which can be translated into many words accurately and has no single meaning, but roughly means ‘energy’ or ‘spirit’ and ‘breath’ or ‘air’ as sort of a double meaning exemplifying the connection between breath and life or spiritual energy, also refered to as \"ki\" in other asian arts. It is generally understood as the universal energy that flows through and around us.
THus, SHaolin Kung Fu can be considered \"PErfected Skill in Qi, or \"Prefected skill in the art of Spirit and Energy\".

Shaolin Kung Fu is a highly effective martial art in terms of energy use and posture use, modeled historically after postures that exemplify peak physical advantage and are often described in terms of natural occurances, such as animals are elements. THe art includes not only contact attacks, manipulations, holds, and pressure points, but also meditation, understanding, and medicinal studies, and in traditional practice the Shaolin monks learned both the martial art form and the academic nature of medicinal herbology and energy work. The medicinal and philosophical teachings of shaolin exemplify the use and understanding of the universal energy, whereas the martial arts of the Shaolin exemplifies the effective use of energy in the form of force, power, speed, and control over not only your movements and self energy but your opponent's energy as well. THis is notably different then Aikido in that Aikido is a much newer adaptation of the Japanese Samurai arts and in its modern form is purely energy manipulation and thus considered less \"violent\", whereas Kung Fu is more direct use of energy(note: Aikido if catagorized in terms of chinese thought would be an \"internal\" school).


Further expansion on this to follow, hope that explains it well enough for now. I'll have to refresh my memory to dig out more then that.

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21 Apr 2007 06:33 #1124 by HesinRaca
Replied by HesinRaca on topic Shaolin Kung Fu/Wushu
As a secondary note. It is important to note that the concepts of the Shaolin Monks mirror those of the Jedi quite a bit, though for obvious reasons relating to the historical culture at the time, the Martial Arts were a larger portion of their philosophy then ours currently is.


So for the sake of connecting the two, here's my synopsis on the philosophy side of SHaolin Kung Fu.


The Shaolin Monestary is a Buddhist Monestary that combines martial arts and Chan Buddhism(Zen Buddhism), and has since its construction. Monks at the monestary can thus be clerical, martial or scholars. The Martial Arts is as described but the Chan Buddhism is something valuable as well. By application, Chan Buddhism is an art that allows you to store and build up qi. Coupled with the Kung Fu which is said to be a martial art that is the act of releasing qi. Thus they are a good pair.

Zen emphasizes the concept of the ultimate truth best being experienced firsthand, rather than pursued through study. Zen is noted for its emphasis on the manifestation of spiritual practice in daily activities rather than through philosophical explanations and thought.It is also known for its use of special teaching techniques that aid in this spiritual connection between thought and lifestyle. Generally it is philosophy that involves a focus on the perpetuation of peace, calm, tranquility, and control of one's self. It is more or less a specific school of Buddhism.

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  • Twsoundsoff
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21 Apr 2007 07:26 #1127 by Twsoundsoff
Replied by Twsoundsoff on topic Shaolin Kung Fu/Wushu
Thank you for this elaboration. I now have a much firmer grasp of what these concepts are and how they may relate to not only our practice of Jediism but also the practice of discipline in life. MTFBWY

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  • thud thorax
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08 May 2007 12:34 #1880 by thud thorax
Replied by thud thorax on topic Shaolin Kung Fu/Wushu
Greetings, i am thud thorax. I am happy to see that there are others here with Eastern philosophies and training as a basis for their journey. I started with an external style called Dragon Shadow, a derivative of Northern Shaolin, known as Seung Gar, and taught only by one family in one province. My Teacher was David Seung, nephew of Huen San Seung, third line down from Grandmaster of the style, whose name escapes me. This art was a mirror form with imperfect presentations of structure, eg: weak, pliant very yielding tan sau applied on the striking limb, slightly behind in tempo, the result being an advantage in second strike, being the finishing blow.

I studied other styles over the years, but am now happy learning Chow Gar Toon Long from a teacher three instructors removed from Ip Shoi, the recently departed grandmaster. This style is tempered by my Sifu with Wing Chun to balance my meridians, as the Chow Gar is a very \"hard\" internal style. The use of Wing Chun is also necessary for the tai Chi forms, essential when dealing with the application of Dim Mak.

I look forward to further discussions with you, and Michael Cappanelli may also wish to discuss things, as he is also adept at translating the deeper concepts into useful skills.

thud

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  • Merin Kyo Den
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08 May 2007 14:49 #1888 by Merin Kyo Den
Replied by Merin Kyo Den on topic Shaolin Kung Fu/Wushu
HesinRaca wrote:

Zen emphasizes the concept of the ultimate truth best being experienced firsthand, rather than pursued through study. Zen is noted for its emphasis on the manifestation of spiritual practice in daily activities rather than through philosophical explanations and thought.It is also known for its use of special teaching techniques that aid in this spiritual connection between thought and lifestyle. Generally it is philosophy that involves a focus on the perpetuation of peace, calm, tranquility, and control of one's self. It is more or less a specific school of Buddhism.


This is about as good a summery of Zen that I've ever seen. I'm of the Zen school myself. Remember that even within Zen their are different sects. Br John is Pure Land I believe while I lean towards the Rinzai and Soto Schools.

and Michael Cappanelli may also wish to discuss things, as he is also adept at translating the deeper concepts into useful skills.


Het Thud, I'd be glad to talk shop. And welcome aboard!

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27 Aug 2007 02:34 #6346 by Daniel L.
Replied by Daniel L. on topic Shaolin Kung Fu/Wushu
Are you a teacher of this wushu?
my main style Zui Quan is a Shoalin Kung Fu/Wushu lesser known art mostly made fun off and well i guess thats the point of it to...most know it as DRUNKEN MASTER.I know i have talked about this style over and over but its because this style is well NOT REAL in the US int not lagit and i hope i find a teacher for it.Thats why i hope you can help me out on this one....Ive done my best to learn what i can about it well i must be doing some thing right because ive only been beaten with it one time out of the 4 times i used it.I have a great love for this style because its not only a defenceve style it also teacher a lesson in humility to any one that fights against it. To make fun of a drunk and then lose to one well thats a good lesson for any tuff guy.

A Knight is sworn to valor
His heart knows only virtue
His word specks only truth
His blade deffends the helpless
His might up holds the weak
His rath undoes the wicked

Virtue: You dont need a reason to help people
Devotion: I will always change, but I will always be myself.
Sorrow: How do you prove you exist...? Maybe we dont exist...
Dilemma: Having sworn fealty, must I spend my life in servitude?
Indulgence: I do what I want! Do you have a problem!?
Arrogance: The only dependable thing about the future is uncertainty.
Despair: To be forgotten is worse than death.
/Solitude: do not walk behind me for a may not lead you,do not walk ahead of me for i may not follow dont walk beside me for i may not need you,just know that im here.

Student of the Living Force

"It is one thing to teach something abstract and quite another to teach one how to un-learn illusions they have been living for years"- Alexandre Orion

Rite:Pure Land
Apprentices:
Old Apprentices:Yanna_Sky, Barhis, general smith
Old Master:Lenny Alsop

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  • MindasArran
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03 Sep 2007 05:22 #6609 by MindasArran
Replied by MindasArran on topic Shaolin Kung Fu/Wushu
Zui Ji Quan isn't that rare... I would be very surprised if there were no schools for it here in the US somewhere. I know I've seen it in many a manual and video being sold.

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16 Sep 2007 09:18 #7178 by Daniel L.
Replied by Daniel L. on topic Shaolin Kung Fu/Wushu
true i have seen books and videos but its hard to learn from thing like that and i was hoping some one might know of a teacher or a school any were in the US...
i asked an Expert and he told me its not lagit in the US so im about ready to give up on looking and just IMPROV in hopes that i get good nuff for some one to want to learn it from me \"I REALLY WANT TO KEEP THIS STYLE ALIVE\"!!!!

Student of the Living Force

"It is one thing to teach something abstract and quite another to teach one how to un-learn illusions they have been living for years"- Alexandre Orion

Rite:Pure Land
Apprentices:
Old Apprentices:Yanna_Sky, Barhis, general smith
Old Master:Lenny Alsop

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