Should Jedi (when of age) have CHILDREN??

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Re: Should Jedi (when of age) have CHILDREN?? 23 Dec 2011 11:20 #46481

Learn_to_Know wrote:
However, I'm not ready to subscribe to the idea that Jedi should have children. There is much that a Jedi can do in their service and compassion to others that doesn't have to involve raising their own. Perhaps even seeking out those children that are in a less fortunate position and helping them in some way?


As a matter of semantics, should and must are not the same. Jedi should have children but not all have the capacity or capability at this time in their life. I would also point out that working with any child is a form of parenting. If you have a desire to help other children that is wonderful. As a past PTA member I worked with many children in the school. I was also a Scout Master for several years.

In any one of these cases, you are raising children, you just are not paying for their cloths so to speak. Your influence on a child has an effect on them that lasts a lifetime. I have children I worked with 10 years ago saying hi to me in the grocery store. I wish I could remember all their names. They remember me because of the time I took to teach them how to read, or make paper, or chalk. I, in a very real sense, took an active part in raising that child.

So...raise your own or raise others? Either way be a positive role model!
Jedi Knight
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Master: Mark Anjuu
Former Apprentice: Jedi Knight Arcade
Current Apprentice:Mathew Erickson

Read what I wrote not with your emotion and interpretation, but with mine!

"Right and wrong, good and evil, light and dark most of the time, they are illusions that prevent us from perceiving the greater reality. The Jedi have learned to distance themselves from these illusions, to seek the truth beneath the words"
Luke Skywalker

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Re: Should Jedi (when of age) have CHILDREN?? 23 Dec 2011 12:16 #46484

Sapadu wrote:
'HAH!' Kendalina guffawed. Immediately, Jack should have known the Vader quote would upset her, 'Redemption for killing, what, THOUSANDS of people, just because he got that stupid b**** senator from Naboo knocked up and she popped out TWO kids? How is that redeeming in the SLIGHTEST?'

"Kendalina, you're not helping your case when I try to defend you as a pro-feminist model." Jack mumbled.

'No, I'm serious. The mother is the one who did all the work, Vader didn't play ANY role in how they grew up -- what with never BEING there or even being AWARE the children had been born or survived -- and he didn't get his head out of his @$$ until the very last second.' Kendalina fumed. Triclops didn't say a word, merely sitting by and knitting, 'And your children being the best of you? KARK THAT! That's just lazy, relying on a kid to justify your existence. You should be a good person on your OWN! Lookit Jango Fett! Having Boba Fett didn't redeem him. Or the Emperor for that matter -- 'cuz, y'know, HE was such a great person because of Trike!'

'The Emperor didn't have kids!' Interrupted Kakeru, in a very Star Trek-not-knowing-Star-Wars-lore sort of voice.

'Sure he did -- but it was in cloning experiments kinda like the Jango/Boba Fett crossed with Frankenstein way.' James snapped back, fanboy to the core. Tired of the argument, Triclops sighed.

'Maybe the real lesson is Vader's ability to love.' It certainly shut everyone up, 'He turned to the Dark Side because the obsessive, violent part of his love for his wife turned into possessiveness. What redeems him is the fact that he loves his son enough to save that son.'

"I like her passion, but I think we disagree on the word redeem," LTK said quietly.

His Force Conscience paused momentarily before prompting softly, "What does redeem mean to you?"

LTK contemplated carefully, debating within himself how to best phrase it. Not being entirely sure of his choice of words, he proceeded cautiously.

"I look at redeem in this scenario with Vader as simply a desire to not repeat the same mistakes again." LTK paused a moment, feeling like he wasn't being as clear as he desired. "He finally turned his back on the darkness, and it was because of the suffering of his son, what he was witnessing that spurred him on. His child may not have redeemed him from his past evils, but he certainly effected a huge change on Vader as he turned against the embodiment of evil. That is kind of like redemption, isn't?"

His Force Conscience nodded sagely, but was somewhat disappointed at LTK's struggling to explain a concept that should be clear and concise. "What about her comment about using a kid to justify your existence. I believe she said you should be a good person on your own, not just because you have a kid."

LTK quickly replied, "I agree with her there. We should be a good person on our own. To have to rely on children to be good would be an attachment a Jedi shouldn't have."

His Force Conscience smiled delightedly. "She is definitely right. And you are on your way to understanding this, possibly as well as she already does. But one thing shouldn't be forgotten: understand that you should be a good person on your own, you should strive to be an even better person when guarding and training a light that comes from the Force."
Master: Jestor
Apprentice: Psyddhattha
“I have striven not to laugh at human actions, not to weep at them, nor to hate them, but to understand them" -- Baruch Spinoza.

Re: Should Jedi (when of age) have CHILDREN?? 23 Dec 2011 14:41 #46488

  • Leena
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I must say I like the question a lot. I agree with Phortis Nespin on this as far as the answer. I would love to have children and plan to when I find the right man to have them with. Now, aside from work, I have taught kids, mentored, and other things. It's so important to be a positive role model.

As for redeeming, that's an interesting point. Can that act of saving his son redeem Vader? Well, acording to some religions, yes. In Islam, I believe Muhammad said that if you do a bad deed followed by a good deed, the good deed will wipe out the bad one. In Christianity, Jesus' sacrifice redeems any who accept him and repent. Is everyone redeemed by their children, no. I think perhaps Vader was. Honestly, their mother didn't do all the work. She had the children and died. They were each raised by different people. It is a testament to Anakin Skywalker that even after he became Darth Vader and didn't know his kids, he still saved Luke's life and, ultimately, sacrificed his own.
Leena
“In times of change the learners will inherit the earth, while the knowers will find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists. ” Eric Hoffer
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Re: Should Jedi (when of age) have CHILDREN?? 23 Dec 2011 23:20 #46494

  • RyuJin
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i say, let things happen as they must... if one is meant to have children it will happen (whether they plan to or not). whether we have children or not we should still provide a positive rolemodel to all(adult and children alike).
I do not need a cloak of darkness, I am darkness and I am light. I am both because the universe is both.
Warning: Spoiler! [ Click to expand ]

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Former masters: GM KanaSeikoHaruki, Br.John
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Re: Should Jedi (when of age) have CHILDREN?? 24 Dec 2011 03:24 #46495

I have 3 daughters and a gran daughter, they are my life!!!

Re: Should Jedi (when of age) have CHILDREN?? 24 Dec 2011 03:59 #46496

I have three fantastic children, I can't think of life without them now.

When my 1st one was on the way I was so very worried as I was not sure I was ready to be a dad, but when are we ever ready ???

Re: Should Jedi (when of age) have CHILDREN?? 24 Dec 2011 16:33 #46502

I don't really agree with Lucas that the point of life is having children- that's what a virus does, not more complex living things. We are more than our children.

However, I am a father myself, and can see the arguments for and against it in my own experiences. Parenting is a valuable teaching experience, and can be a great joy and fulfillment. However, your own body and mind does attempt to betray you and cause you to instinctively center on them. It has proven genetically valuable, but may not be the wisest course of action for a Jedi.

Through application of will, I have gotten to a place where I love my children, but feel no attachment to them, and do not revolve my life around them. Not many parents do all three of those things.

Saying Jedi should have children is something of a loaded statement to something that has advantages and disadvantages. I would say Jedi should be allowed to have children.
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