Big bang theory and the Force (childrens version)

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Big bang theory and the Force (childrens version) 13 Aug 2008 14:36 #17896

In the beginning there were four forces held tightly by a unifying Force that kept them all together. One day the four Young forces got into a huge fight.

'I want my own space' said the strongest Force.
Each of the other forces agreed and at risking the happiness of the little family The Force, in it's infinite knowledge and power agreed to help them out.

'I will give you space but you must work together because we are a family' The Force released one of them into the infinite blackness and the others quickly followed.

Shortly after the universe was filled with energy and heat. But the Force reminded them of their promise. They came together and stretched out combining their gifts.
The forces worked together to create clouds of dust which became stars which died very quickly. Saddened the forces went to the Force with their complaints.
'Everything we create dies. Isn't there something we can do?'
The Force, with it's caring eyes looked down at its family and explained.
'Nothing you create will last forever. In order to create new things the old things must die. Continue to create and they will begin to last longer, give it time.'

Sure enough after several thousand years stars were created out of the dust, stronger matter was created from the dying stars and planets were created from that.

Eventually out of the dust our the Sun was created and our little blue planet was created. At first it was nothing but a ball of heated matter but over time it got cooler one of the forces choose to stay around and influence us directly and the other indirectly.

In our early years as human beings we had a direct connection to the Force but over time, as humans tend to do, we forgot from which we came from. The Force has had many names and many parts. And we are finally learning to connect to it again.




So, what do ya'll think?

Re:Big bang theory and the Force (childrens version) 13 Aug 2008 14:46 #17897

  • Wander
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Now that is interesting O.o makes alot of since when you sit there and start thinking about it. Very intreasting little story and theroy which goes on with the idea of other galaxys around us.

Re:Big bang theory and the Force (childrens version) 13 Aug 2008 15:24 #17898

I took actual science theory and combined it with the belief in the Force. This is sort of what i believe so i thought it would be a good idea to make it suitible for children. :)

Re:Big bang theory and the Force (childrens version) 13 Aug 2008 15:51 #17899

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well would be true as the force is unstable energy and most children are hyper like me so the child idea fits perfectly in opinio

Re:Big bang theory and the Force (childrens version) 13 Aug 2008 17:37 #17912

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Hehe, awesome April :D
Master Knight of Jediism
Bishop of Jediism

Re:Big bang theory and the Force (childrens version) 13 Aug 2008 17:39 #17913

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I believe that you have just created the first Jedi bedtime story / folklore tale for younglings. Nice one Sister April

Re:Big bang theory and the Force (childrens version) 13 Aug 2008 19:14 #17916

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I agree with what you said April and also with Lenny about this being a story to pass on to the younger generation. We have lost much in knowledge because of technology, it is time to combine the old with the new and allow it to grow as the younger forces did in their time. We are slowly reconnecting with the elements which of course stems from the Force. By many standards we are a young species, with great potential.

Re:Big bang theory and the Force (childrens version) 16 Aug 2008 12:54 #17999

That was what i was going for, not to mention this story allows for the explanation of any diety you choose. It is completely pure, no dharma thrown in. So, Christian Jedi, Pagan Jedi, or Sith. It all works. I hadn't thought of the Bedtime story part though. Maybe someone should try it out and see if it works. *hint hint, poke poke* :D

Re:Big bang theory and the Force (childrens version) 06 Sep 2009 12:20 #25611

*bump*

Re:Big bang theory and the Force (childrens version) 08 Sep 2009 06:25 #25642

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That really is an interesting story Master April, and whilst reading it makes very much sense. In fact this kind of reminds me of Simarilion by J.R.R.Tolkien and his version of the creation of the world.

At to using this for children I do think it needs working on. For one the mention of the one big Force, and the four other forces where one of them is stronger. That could prove to be a little to abstract and confusing for some children. Maybe by giving them names and describing what they do may help to construct a pictures in their minds. Also what gifts are they which these forces share? Also the death part where matter becomes stronger may require also a picturesque story.
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