Do you believe in déjà vu?

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Do you believe in déjà vu? 01 May 2012 19:56 #58578

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I was wondering what people think about déjà vu.

It's something that I personally haven't experienced more than a few times. But on the odd occasion that I've felt it it's really freaked me out!

I was thinking about how déjà vu could possibly be explained through the concept of 'the eternal present' or 'the eternal now' as discussed in the Initiate's Programme, probably by Joseph Campbell and possibly also by Alan Watts, if I remember correctly. As in, do past and future really exist or is everything happening all at the same time?

So...

Have you had any strong or frequent déjà vu experiences?
So do you believe in déjà vu? Why/why not?
If you do, what is your explanation for it, if any?

Or feel free to ramble and ignore my questions, they're just pointers really. I'm just interested to know what people think!

Re: Do you believe in déjà vu? 01 May 2012 20:07 #58581

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Have you had any strong or frequent déjà vu experiences?
Yes, I have.

So do you believe in déjà vu? Why/why not?
Of course I do! Because I have experienced it before. :)

If you do, what is your explanation for it, if any?
I'm not sure I've ever thought about it on a personal level before. I've heard others ideas about it, though. One is similar to yours - but that we were allowed to see our lives before we lived it as a form of comfort of sorts.
Another is past lives and all that.
As for me, I truly have no idea..
Informative, huh?
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Re: Do you believe in déjà vu? 01 May 2012 20:13 #58583

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I think I've seen this topic before... :woohoo:

I've had deja vu, and currently the best explanation for it is actually that it's caused by an error in your memory

While you're 'seeing' the event, for whatever reason, this is also processed in your short term memory as well. This gives the impression that you are seeing and remembering it simultaneously

That's why you think you can remember the same experience :)

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Re: Do you believe in déjà vu? 01 May 2012 20:44 #58597

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I've only experienced it a couple of times. They felt like connecting through time or some parallel dimension!!! The most confusing ones I've had are when it links up to something that happened in a dream, as they feel like the dream was some sort of premonition. I dont have an opinion on what they are yet because I havent had them enough... literally about 3 times in my whole life.

Re: Do you believe in déjà vu? 01 May 2012 20:56 #58599

First, V, I have to say this is an extremely intriguing topic! Since I was young, I've had deja vu at least 4 to 5 times a month. Towards the age of 16 and 17, it started to grow stronger for a reason I didn't know, but it's not something I would have asked a doctor about. It came to a point where the deja vu moments were lasting longer, becoming remembered faster (so that I KNEW what was going to happen before it did), and all the more "insane." For example, I had an instance where I immediately regained that memory of talking to a specific friend right as it happened. I spoke every word of his sentence with him at the same time he did. It frightened him, but I enjoyed it. After deja vu, I usually recall the night I had the dream and waking up/completely forgetting it until the moment it lined up.

Have you had any strong or frequent déjà vu experiences?
Usually Strong, and always pretty frequent!
So do you believe in déjà vu? Why/why not?
I do more than I used to because of the coincidence and strength of certain times.
If you do, what is your explanation for it, if any?\
Honestly, It's hard to say not only where it comes from, but what the point of it really is. When it all comes down to it, none of my deja vu moments prove any sort of real significance other than exciting serendipity and such.

Re: Do you believe in déjà vu? 01 May 2012 21:23 #58604

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I've certainly experienced it.
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Re: Do you believe in déjà vu? 01 May 2012 21:48 #58607

Absolutely...sometimes it is a comfort, other times rather disturbing.

Re: Do you believe in déjà vu? 02 May 2012 01:31 #58622

I have experienced it several times. Depending on the feelings I have at the time, I find that if the feeling is bad, I alter my course of action. If the feeling is good, I let the scenareo play out. I also feel like "tunnel vision" when it happens. A very focused point in time and with acute awareness.

Yes V-Tog, it freaks me out too.
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Re: Do you believe in déjà vu? 02 May 2012 01:50 #58625

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I experience it quite often. I'm sure it can be explained, I just like to call it a glitch in the Matrix. :D
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Re: Do you believe in déjà vu? 02 May 2012 02:04 #58629

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I've experienced it. The problem with it is that there never is a proper memory of the "first" experience. I'll go with Akkarin's explanation and assume two different inodes pointing to the same file.
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