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    • Forum Access Changes (Last post by Adder)
    • Quote: When I was a guest, it was heavily implied my opinion didn't count because I wasn't a member. When I was a member, it was heavily implied my voice didn't count because I wasn't an initiate. When I was an initiate, it was heavily implied my opinion wasn't noteworthy because I wasn't an apprentice. Say what!? I'll assume you've adjust your interpretation based on the obvious differences to involvement which naturally increases with something like rank before saying something like that in public, Wow, that is quite an accusation. Have you taken this up with anyone, Council, Mods, Clergy etc?
    • Philosophy Tech Support (Last post by ren)
    • It's no different from identifying as zen or existentialist; a self-description or declaration of interest (like the totjo SIGs).
    • No offense, but... (Last post by Rickie The Grey)
    • Sure. You always have choice. That won't change responsibility if in fact you are responsible. Now stop being so sensitive,
    • My work with the Force (Last post by taidavrikaurvan)
    • Quote: If I were a cynic I would say that you are encouraging people to live in their own delusions instead of reality. BUT I'm not. ;) It was a very good read, a lot of which I agree with, or at least have common threads in my own life philosophy. Did you say Streen was your master? The Streen who writes here on occasion? Also, will you stay and add your voice for awhile? Some of my stuff is a bit out there lol. Thank you for the kind comments. Streen was indeed my master has been for 10 years. I will be here for some time. Listening and learning :)
    • TotJO on Tumblr (Last post by Akkarin)
    • Quote: *does little dance* Hooray! Seriously, I use tumblr as my primary space to blog and is probably more prevalent in my social networking activities than Facebook or Twitter. There are so many of these online things now... Language: Spoiler: [image] :silly:
    • NUS Won't Condemn ISIS Because of "Islamophob... (Last post by Revan Falton)
    • Quote: I've put this is the humour section, because I wasn't sure whether to laugh or cry :P :unsure: tab.co.uk/2014/10/14/nus-refuses-to-cond...se-its-islamophobic/ Sadly the NUS (National Union of Students) is a complete and utter shambles I am ashamed to have "representing" me. Wow, I can not believe what I just read. And as an American, and a former soldier in the US Military, our "attacks" are laughable at best. In my personal opinion its just used for political approval to make it look like to the voters that our Administration is doing something about the situation.
    • Exploring and Understanding Acceptance (Last post by Connor L.)
    • Acceptance means nothing on its own. It can only be applied when there is a reference point. So, I can only speak to it in a context. Lets talk about a context, then. I just recently found out I might be gay. After another failed relationship, I keep finding myself coming back to the same conclusion: maybe I like men, not women. And, I can't just jump on the bandwagon, I have to look at the evidence. 1. Ok, Dr. Wilson on House is really cute... OMG. I guess that's all one needs really. It's abrupt, but I can picture that in many different scenarios. I can see my attraction towards men in many of my male friends I find attractive. But, there is a problem: Why would I spend so much time denying something that is so clear? Easy! Because I've been taught to be straight. I've been taught to have a wife, two kids, a nice house. This is what I was taught to want. But, for as long as I can remember, I have had internal conflict about it. I have always felt "something" wrong about being in a relationship with a woman. And, I've had 3 serious relationships (I'm only 21, that's pretty good for my age!). Why, oh WHY would it take so long to accept this? ALL of my friends would tell me they think I'm gay, and I ignore them. My last girlfriend told me repeatedly that she thought I liked men, but I denied it. Even my mother has been asking me since I was 13-14 if I was gay. I have been assaulted by repeated evidence of my homosexuality, but because it was uncomfortable... Sometimes, I think we refuse the truth because it isn't as neat and tidy as we'd like it to be. Homosexuality comes with a lot of problems (then again, so does being Straight, yeah?) that are unique to the situation. There are stigmas, there are legal problems, there are ___. It's neverending. Some of my family might hate me. Thankfully, my parents are supportive if I decide to tell them. But, then again, for as long as I can remember, ever since I started becoming sexual, my life has become more bland.. More gray. Less interesting and more formulaic. It became easy to become a shell sexually and just move through the motions. Find a woman, let her hurt me and soothe me... and that's it. But, my long-term girlfriends eventually saw through the ruse. They accused me of not loving them, no matter how much I thought I was... I was so un-selfaware that I didn't know what was happening. Acceptance is tough because denying it is safe, sometimes. You can try the whole ignorance is bliss thing... but, all you're doing is dying while you're alive, as Mark Twain would say.
    • You do what you are (Last post by Goken)
    • Quote: In my opinion he is referring to the characteristics of one self. For example: a compassionate person that turns malevolent, or an honest person suddenly acts as a liar, then they are betraying what they truly are, which is sad. I do think that we do what we are, in the sense I said before. I guess I had originally thought the quote to be about proffession, but I like this more. It makes me feel a bit better to think of 'do' as how you behave and act rather than your job. I'd hope people think of me as more than a banker. lol
    • Krishnamurti: “It is no measure of health to be we... (Last post by Kohadre)
    • www.wildmind.org/blogs/quote-of-the-mont...ti-measure-of-health I once had a disturbed young man come to a meditation class I was teaching in Edinburgh. As we’d gathered and during the meditation instruction I’d noticed that he was unusually intense and that he had noticeably poor personal hygiene, but in most ways he seemed like a fairly typical young man. In the discussion following, however, his conversation started to veer off into more bizarre areas. He’d had “cosmic” experiences during the meditation session — experiences whose details I no longer recall but which sounded very off-balance. His girlfriend was apparently an Iranian princess. He was being shadowed by various security forces. Later still, as we were winding up and preparing to leave, and he was able to talk to me more or less alone, his conversation became more delusional still. He had developed special powers through his spiritual practice and could make things happen in the world around him. As we talked a housefly smacked noisily into the glass door we were standing beside. “See!” he said, excitedly. “I made that happen.” He was obviously ill and suffering, and I experienced that pang of knowing that there was little or nothing I could do to help. I’m no mental health professional, but his behaviors reminded me of what little I knew about schizophrenia and so I suggested as kindly as I could that he might be misinterpreting his experiences and that he might want to talk to a doctor about what was going on. He was clearly having problems with his mental health, but here’s the thing: according to the Buddha, so were the rest of us. “All worldlings are mad,” he said. “Worldling” is a translation of “putthujana,” which is simply anyone who isn’t enlightened. That’s me, and you. The Buddha had his own ideas about what constitutes mental health, and by his definition anyone who isn’t well on the way to Enlightenment is insane. Quite how literally he meant it when he said “All worldlings are mad” is hard to say, but when he looked at ordinary people like us going about their daily business he saw a world out of balance — and a world that by necessity is out of balance, because it is composed of those same off-kilter individuals. He had a term for this imbalance, which was viparyasa in Sanskrit, although the less-well-known Pali equivalent vipallasa is a bit easier on the tongue and the eye. Vipallasa means “inversion,” “perversion,” or “derangement.” Specifically, in using this term the Buddha was talking about the ways in which we misunderstand the world we live in, and the ways in which we misunderstand ourselves. Just at the young man at my meditation class was constantly misinterpreting what was happening (“See! I made that happen”) so too do the rest of us live in a virtual reality of delusion, confusion, and distortion. What’s more, we largely share the same delusions, which means that we don’t even realize that our minds are disturbed. And thus, as Krishnamurti suggests, it’s possible to think that we’re spiritually and mentally healthy because we share our mistaken values and understandings with those around us. Collectively, our ill minds create a society that is itself ill, and we consider ourselves healthy because we see our values reflected in our fellow worldlings. When I think of the vipallasas in modern life I’m overwhelmed by examples, but the one that springs most to mind is to materialism. We keep thinking that the answer to our sense of existential dissatisfaction is to buy more stuff: more stuff, and better stuff. I guess I notice this most with gadgets, but for other people it’s houses, furniture, shoes, clothes, or cars — none of which I care about at all. I get a new gadget — the shiny MacBook Pro I’m writing this article on, for example — and I feel a sense of pleasure just looking at it. It’s better, faster, prettier than any computer I’ve had before. But then what happens over time? Newer, better, faster, prettier computers come on the market, and I start comparing my machine unfavorably with them. My gadget starts to look a bit old-fashioned (after only six months!), less cool, less capable. It feels less fast. And I’m no longer so happy with it. I now start to hanker after something new. And I’ve been through all this craziness before. (Don’t they say that insanity is doing the same time over and over and expecting a different result?) Even knowing that I’m on a materialistic treadmill doesn’t entirely blunt the craving for a new computer, although to give myself credit I live without a television and rarely make impulse purchases. But on some level I really believe that the answer to the discomfort of my cravings will arrive in a box carried by a UPS truck. I work with these cravings in my meditation and in my daily life, because the Buddha suggested that there was a better answer to the problem of craving. His advice was that we need to look deeply at our craving itself, and to realize the many levels of delusion that come packaged with it. The new gadget (or pair of shoes, or that lovely sweater, or sexy car) doesn’t contain a magical ingredient that will make us happy. The object of our craving is impermanent and therefore incapable of giving lasting satisfaction. Our craving itself is impermanent! We can watch cravings arise and pass. As we watch them come and go, choosing not to act on them, they begin to develop an unreal appearance. As we start increasingly to see through them we no longer take them so seriously, and they become weaker and less frequent. And in the end we come to see what the Buddha himself saw, which is that the answer to the problem of our cravings is not acquiring the object of our cravings but letting go of craving itself. It’s through abandoning craving that we will finally find peace, that we’ll come back to our senses, stop seeing things in a distorted way, and find true health and wellbeing. And having done that, to whatever degree, we can look around at the imbalance that surrounds us — really seeing it — and then compassionately reach out to others so that we can help them bring about their own healing.

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