Why Are People Still Afraid of Atheism?

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Re: Why Are People Still Afraid of Atheism? 28 Nov 2011 06:47 #45110

Adder wrote:
I think a problem with Atheism is that religion has long been associated with being the source for morality, and Atheists havent realized that they currently are seen purely as a counter-culture which is not a self supporting system of its own equivilant to the religions. Since morality is so integral to religion, when a culture rejects religion it can be seen as rejecting those aspects of morality. While this might not be true individually as atheists sometimes argue morality exists within all humans as a choice, the problem is atheists are not associated with having a definition of morality. Some people might fear that in terms of measuring trust, and this could be amplified by terms used by some atheists to label all religious people as crazy, and not just the crazy religious people are crazy.

For me though, Atheism is a fine choice for some, but its like going to a theme park and not going on one the rides IMO.

Having said that I definatly dont prescribe to what I call liturgical suffrage and blind doctoral faith, but I do think that blind faith can be a tool, and the religious content can be the raw materials, together for accessing 'spirituality', whether that be higher human functions or metaphysical natures.

So for me most religions are better represented as models for metaprogramming of the brain to allow our minds to access, and be accessed by, the subconscious and through that, hopefully, the metaphysical realm. If the metaphysical realm does exist, then because the subconscious mind not only has access to the senses, but it has access to the full range of capabilities of the senses, it might be the pathway to it. The conscious mind only gets what the subconscious mind considers relevant to interaction and survival in our environment as a function of available brain capacity, apparantly.

So for me belief in an 'other' higher conscious plane of existance that is caged in terms of reference which our conscious minds can understand, such as personified God/s, creates a shared language that our conscious and subconscious minds can use to communicate, other then the hackneyed physical feelings and emotions. From that greater awareness hopefully we can achieve greater access to the Force.

So I sort of see atheists just as people who are not interested in trying to use metaprogramming to increase their spirituality - nothing wrong with that but on the other hand it makes all the effort by many athesists to attack beliefs seem pointless. Attacking religions on the other hand can be more meaningul sometimes, but these are human institutions run by humans and humans are definatly not perfect, especially when we are talking about things occuring over thousands of years.

I agree 99.99%. The only thing I don't agree with is attacking religions for it isn't just a "thing" out there but dear and close personal beliefs of people and people should all be treated with respect and so shall their ideas. I respect a Wiccan's religion even though there is some parts that don't make sense to me like dipping a knife into a cup of water somehow does something? Which I don't understand but I will respect that for it is their symbolism of something bigger of some sort. Other than that I say spot on.

Re: Why Are People Still Afraid of Atheism? 28 Nov 2011 06:57 #45112

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Nameless3450 wrote:
I agree 99.99%. The only thing I don't agree with is attacking religions for it isn't just a "thing" out there but dear and close personal beliefs of people and people should all be treated with respect and so shall their ideas. I respect a Wiccan's religion even though there is some parts that don't make sense to me like dipping a knife into a cup of water somehow does something? Which I don't understand but I will respect that for it is their symbolism of something bigger of some sort. Other than that I say spot on.

Dowh! You caught the pre-edit version where I said doctoral instead of doctrinal :pinch: LOL dammit. Yep Nameless3450, definatly agree respect of others is vital, perhaps moreso if its unfamiliar as respect could be the most efficient way to enable learning more about it.
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Last Edit: 28 Nov 2011 07:02 by Adder.

Re: Why Are People Still Afraid of Atheism? 29 Nov 2011 21:46 #45210

As you will note below my icon to the left, I have the phrase “Fear is the lack of knowledge”. I believe, that in all things, the differences that arise among people are handled in a similar way. If there is a difference that the larger group does not understand or believe is the incorrect interpretation of social order, and if they do not try to understand the differences of the smaller group or individual, fear is born.

As fear grows, the divide between the groups widen. Alienation along with unrealistic and more often false accusations arises about each other’s group. Stories are told and become more and more outlandish. “FEAR those that do not think like us for they are the antichrist!” “Do not say prayers in the classroom or my child may become some religious fanatic!” Believe me, as a catholic and a PTA (parent-teacher association) past president, I have heard both of these things in many ways and from many people.

Could it be that a person that is spending so much time trying to remove prayer from everywhere, is thinking more about religion because he fears the unknown of the “here-after”? Could it be that the universal consciousness we call the Force is trying to reach out to that person and redirect their path?

Could it be that a person so wrapped up in their religious beliefs is actually having a crisis of faith and is overcompensating? Are they trying to talk themselves into faith because they don’t know what to actually believe?

What I am not saying is that people need a religion in one of the standard faiths, but in something. Morality has no religion because it is not religion based. It is humanity based. It is the idea that we are all here together and we all inherit an inalienable right to life. The fact is that people are inherently good and wish no harm upon another.

We learn to hate and that hatred is borne of our fears of the unknown.

The Force is no stronger in a Christian, Muslim, Hindi, or Buddhist than it is in an Atheist. The Force has no religion! The Force IS! We all must learn to tap into the Force, to understand the path we are on, and to follow that path to enlightenment. On our path, the journey to the end, we must remember that the total consciousness of The Force IS ALL OF US!

Fear leads to the Dark Side in which war is waged and senseless killing is committed against another one of US! Knowledge and Wisdom in all people are the ultimate weapons against war and hatred.

May the true nature of The Force find those that need to find their right path.
Jedi Knight
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Former Apprentice: Jedi Knight Arcade
Current Apprentice:Mathew Erickson

Read what I wrote not with your emotion and interpretation, but with mine!

"Right and wrong, good and evil, light and dark most of the time, they are illusions that prevent us from perceiving the greater reality. The Jedi have learned to distance themselves from these illusions, to seek the truth beneath the words"
Luke Skywalker

“Selflessness is the only antidote to evil. It provides the light that destroys the dark.”
Corran Horn
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Re: Why Are People Still Afraid of Atheism? 30 Nov 2011 09:31 #45225

Phortis Nespin wrote:
As you will note below my icon to the left, I have the phrase “Fear is the lack of knowledge”. I believe, that in all things, the differences that arise among people are handled in a similar way. If there is a difference that the larger group does not understand or believe is the incorrect interpretation of social order, and if they do not try to understand the differences of the smaller group or individual, fear is born.

As fear grows, the divide between the groups widen. Alienation along with unrealistic and more often false accusations arises about each other’s group. Stories are told and become more and more outlandish. “FEAR those that do not think like us for they are the antichrist!” “Do not say prayers in the classroom or my child may become some religious fanatic!” Believe me, as a catholic and a PTA (parent-teacher association) past president, I have heard both of these things in many ways and from many people.

Could it be that a person that is spending so much time trying to remove prayer from everywhere, is thinking more about religion because he fears the unknown of the “here-after”? Could it be that the universal consciousness we call the Force is trying to reach out to that person and redirect their path?

Could it be that a person so wrapped up in their religious beliefs is actually having a crisis of faith and is overcompensating? Are they trying to talk themselves into faith because they don’t know what to actually believe?

What I am not saying is that people need a religion in one of the standard faiths, but in something. Morality has no religion because it is not religion based. It is humanity based. It is the idea that we are all here together and we all inherit an inalienable right to life. The fact is that people are inherently good and wish no harm upon another.

We learn to hate and that hatred is borne of our fears of the unknown.

The Force is no stronger in a Christian, Muslim, Hindi, or Buddhist than it is in an Atheist. The Force has no religion! The Force IS! We all must learn to tap into the Force, to understand the path we are on, and to follow that path to enlightenment. On our path, the journey to the end, we must remember that the total consciousness of The Force IS ALL OF US!

Fear leads to the Dark Side in which war is waged and senseless killing is committed against another one of US! Knowledge and Wisdom in all people are the ultimate weapons against war and hatred.

May the true nature of The Force find those that need to find their right path.

You said mostly what i was going to say lol.

My significant other is a christian and so is her family what i've learnt from talking with them is different depending on the person. Her step-father is probably the most fanatical of them all and the fact that any other religion or point or view is just as valid or possible as his makes him angry. Some other family members who you can tell probably believe in a god mostly out fear and in this case the fear of death and there being absolutely nothing after death. So when science comes along and tries to challenge common conceptions of not just religion but everything that fear of what they hold true to them possibly being wrong would scare anyone in my opinion.

On a side note i personally feel like atheist have a horrible name for themselves these days and it's not because of the bulk it's mostly the idiots that just want to cause mayhem and i personally think it's alot like one of the points i made earlier i think the people that go out and attack other religions or beliefs but for the most part its christians they attack but i think they may fear being wrong and thats their way of feeling more secure.

Re: Why Are People Still Afraid of Atheism? 30 Nov 2011 13:56 #45240

What NumbEffect said, but also:

I think people as less afraid of Atheism than they just dislike a lot of Atheists partly because of the ones that just want to cause mayhem, but also the general "My lack of religion is the only right way and you should believe there is no god too" attitude conveyed by many. This leads some to dislike Atheists for the same reasons that many Atheists feel the same about every other religion. As I always say, evil men are evil men no matter what they profess to believe in.

Re: Why Are People Still Afraid of Atheism? 30 Nov 2011 15:30 #45245

I sm not sure it's fear neccarily as it is to not know. I've been to many churches in my time and each one was a different way to God. If you didn't do it in that churches way you were going to hell. However, one thing that they did share was Jesus' is the only way. I think sometimes people fear atheism because there is perhaps their own fear within their insecurities about their own beliefs that is if there is a real fear amongst those who are of religous faith.

Although, that we're on the subject I personally believe that there is no such thing as Atheism. Doing studies and talking with so-called Athiests believe in something. Either it is the flying pasta monster or that they came from monkies or they believe in aliens and so on. Agonstic is greek meaning for "Not knowing" meaning they are undecided for the most part not saying their isn't and not saying there is a god kind of neutral. Now I may be wrong about my statements and I don't mean to offend anyone if I have because I respect everyone in the temple and I don't want any hard feelings.

Re: Why Are People Still Afraid of Atheism? 30 Nov 2011 15:37 #45246

Ooops pushed the send button lol...but I myself personally I still consider myself a devout believer in Christ and a Jedi. I have dealt over the years of people saying mean and hurtful things and I'm fine with that it's no different when I tell people I am a jedi. One thing I have really learned to excercise the last couple of years in tolerance. Learn to live with people, love people, learn from people. Often, there is just too much hate going around and too little peace. You don't have to like always what people do however, understand that not everyone is like you. Wouldn't the world be a little boring if were all the same? Yes, I love variety and I'm sure God does as well in my own beliefs. There is nothing to be afraid of nor should anybody be.

M.T.F.B.W.Y!

Sven

Re: Why Are People Still Afraid of Atheism? 30 Nov 2011 21:45 #45250

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Uh, I'd like to point out when it comes to evangelism, atheists are far from being the worst. You don't see atheist adverts in hospitals, preachers in the streets, telling christians or whatnot they will eternally suffer for their evil ways. They dont knock at your door to give you the good news or whatever. Your atheist neighbours do not talk behind your back about how you failed to attend the weekly atheist meeting at that atheist place to do atheist things.

ETC

Re: Why Are People Still Afraid of Atheism? 01 Dec 2011 00:58 #45254

Agreed. I actually never see Atheists gather together at all.. But if they do, what do they talk about?
"Hello, everyone! There is no god! Let's begin the day with a group discussion on your experience of godlessness. I baked cookies and brought coffee for everyone, please, help yourself! There is no god! Now, I'll start and we'll go in clockwise order and begin with how you experienced a lack of god this week!"

I'd imagine it more like a support group.. They used to have an Atheist booth out on the Venice beach boardwalk but I think they got tired of sitting there all day talking about the futility of religion. They had pamphlets on the history of Atheism. Books by famous atheists. Seems a limited basis for discussion. The only fuel for conversation I would imagine atheists have would be all the crazy things the fundamentalists do and say! That would be a never ending source of amusement!

Re: Why Are People Still Afraid of Atheism? 01 Dec 2011 02:49 #45260

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ren wrote:
Uh, I'd like to point out when it comes to evangelism, atheists are far from being the worst. You don't see atheist adverts in hospitals, preachers in the streets, telling christians or whatnot they will eternally suffer for their evil ways. They dont knock at your door to give you the good news or whatever. Your atheist neighbours do not talk behind your back about how you failed to attend the weekly atheist meeting at that atheist place to do atheist things.

ETC


And neither should good Christians.... Judge other people... lol...

They should be available if you wanna talk about something.... The door to door thing, eh, they dont bother me.... I told last ones I was a Jedi, and explained my beliefs... I was just shy of a ramble.... lol...
Rite: PureLand
Master: Master Jasper_Ward
Apprentices: Knight Learn_To_Know, Viskhard, DanWerts, Elizabeth, Edan

"I do not demand your faith; I am not setting myself up as an authority. I have nothing to teach you - no new philosophy, no new system, no new path to reality; there is no path to reality any more than to truth. All authority of any kind, especially in the field of thought and understanding, is the most destructive, evil thing. Leaders destroy the followers and followers destroy the leaders. You have to be your own teacher and your own disciple. You have to question everything that man has accepted as valuable, as necessary."~Krishnamurti~

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    • “The lotus is the most beautiful flower, whose petals open one by one. But it will only grow in the mud. In order to grow and gain wisdom, first you must have the mud --- the obstacles of life and its suffering. ... The mud speaks of the common ground that humans share, no matter what our stations in life. ... Whether we have it all or we have nothing, we are all faced with the same obstacles: sadness, loss, illness, dying and death. If we are to strive as human beings to gain more wisdom, more kindness and more compassion, we must have the intention to grow as a lotus and open each petal one by one. ” ― Goldie Hawn

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